Archive for category Medium: Craft

Decorated Lettering || Jan Pickett

Pitched rather nicely between craft and calligraphy, this is a project book for those who aspire to what we might call fancy pen-work.

It starts with some useful guides to techniques and letterforms before moving on to more freestyle work. This then develops into a look at ways of decorating letters that could be described as informal illumination. This is a book for those who want to have some fun rather than make a serious study, and it’s none the worse for that. Further ideas, under headings such as “going dotty” and “fun with pastels”, follow and there are hints, tips and demonstrations where and when they’re required.

The whole is relaxed and colourful while also being informative and inspiring and it’s an easy book to like.

Click the picture to view on Amazon

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Mould Making for Glass || Angela Thwaites

You couldn’t exactly call it a series, but this comes as part of a tradition from Black’s which gives us well-produced and generously-illustrated books on what can reasonably be described as niche crafts. To be fair, glass-working is hardly an obscure pursuit, but it’s also reasonable to say that it’s not mainstream either. General craft publishers have largely ignored it. Découpage, anyone?

I’m not qualified to comment on the quality of what the author says, but I can confirm that the book is well up to Black’s usual standard in this field and that it all looks comprehensive and well laid out. What appears to be a slim paperback turns out to have 144 pages, so it would be unfair to suggest that it’s superficial, either.

The form of the book is to work through all the stages of making and casting from moulds and it’s illustrated (in full colour, making its cover price of £15.99 look very reasonable) with pictures that show both the processes and the work of a variety of contemporary practitioners.

All-in-all, it has the look and feel of a solid introduction to, and a survey of, the subject it covers.

Leave a comment

Design & Make Scarves, Collars, Ties & Belts || Christina Brodie

This new series from Black’s has every appearance of being aimed at the competent amateur rather than the fashion design student and the production slots it in perfectly. The projects are sufficiently detailed that these are much more than just look-at books but sufficiently well and attractively illustrated that they capture the imagination and maintain the interest. If there’s a quibble, it’s that the stockists listed are all in London, but they all appear to have websites and a little time spent with Google or the Yellow Pages should throw up something in your area if you don’t want to go the mail order route.

http://rcm-uk.amazon.co.uk/e/cm?t=artbookreview-21&o=2&p=8&l=as1&asins=0713688343&md=0M5A6TN3AXP2JHJBWT02&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

Leave a comment

Design & Make Fashion Hats || Karen Henriksen

This is a modestly priced book that falls somewhere between the pretty, project-based picture book for the amateur and the expert’s detailed manual.

Well and attractively illustrated, it includes a good variety of designs with enough details of how to make them to ensure that you should be able to achieve the desired results without including so much technical information that you lose the will to continue.

Fashion students will probably find the book annoyingly trivial, but the competent amateur needlecrafter should be well satisfied.

http://rcm-uk.amazon.co.uk/e/cm?t=artbookreview-21&o=2&p=8&l=as1&asins=071368738X&md=0M5A6TN3AXP2JHJBWT02&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

Leave a comment

Design & Make Fashion Bags & Purses || Christina Brodie

This new series from Black’s has every appearance of being aimed at the competent amateur rather than the fashion design student and the production slots it in perfectly. The projects are sufficiently detailed that these are much more than just look-at books but sufficiently well and attractively illustrated that they capture the imagination and maintain the interest. If there’s a quibble, it’s that the stockists listed are all in London, but they all appear to have websites and a little time spent with Google or the Yellow Pages should throw up something in your area if you don’t want to go the mail order route.

http://rcm-uk.amazon.co.uk/e/cm?t=artbookreview-21&o=2&p=8&l=as1&asins=0713688696&md=0M5A6TN3AXP2JHJBWT02&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

Leave a comment

The Knitted Odd-bod Bunch || Donna Wilson

It is quite a joy in itself just to have a quick flick through this book to look at the 35 different little characters you can create. Each has a name and its own personality which makes them all the more lovable. As a novice knitter it’s great to see easy to follow but comprehensive instructions in the back of the book covering the styles of knit and methods used, covering everything you need to know from casting on to casting off, plus everything in between. Instructions for knitting each creature are set out clearly with a step-by-step guide to ensure your kooky animal is perfect. With some characters more complicated than others you can start more simply, building your confidence as you go and work your way up to the more fiddly and elaborate designs. With knitting becoming a hipper pastime, the relevance of a book which shows you how to make quirky creatures is greater than ever.

[DHM]

http://rcm-uk.amazon.co.uk/e/cm?t=artbookreview-21&o=2&p=8&l=as1&asins=1906525412&md=0M5A6TN3AXP2JHJBWT02&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

Leave a comment

Wedding Papercrafts || Ann Brownfield and Jane Cassini

This probably needs to come with a reality check. Unless you already have some competence with papercraft, or you are supremely confident of your ability, it’s probably a good idea not to do any of these projects for real. Anything less than perfection is going to result in a day that looks as though it’s been catered from a pound shop and your efforts could eclipse excellence elsewhere. This is not to belittle pound shops, or a lack of extravagance in weddings, but the fact is that, whatever you do in this area, you really do have to do it well.

Having got that out of the way, this is a brilliant little book that could give your day a very considerable edge and save a deal of money into the bargain. This is another project-based craft book, so you get fairly simple demonstrations of 35 attractive and original ideas for boxes, bags, table decorations, albums and keepsakes, all of which are achievable with something more than just a modicum of skill. All of the items preseted are things which tend to appear at weddings and which can be bought at often considerable prices. By making your own, you can add an individual touch that will make the event much more personal and less manufactured.

As long as you’re realistic about your abilities, or you’re prepared to practice until your results are nothing less than perfect, this is a worthwhile purchase.

http://rcm-uk.amazon.co.uk/e/cm?t=artbookreview-21&o=2&p=8&l=as1&asins=1906094764&md=0M5A6TN3AXP2JHJBWT02&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr

Leave a comment

  • Archives

  • Categories